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Frequently Asked Questions about EIN Finder

 
  1. What is EIN Finder?
  2. Why do customers of EIN Finder need fast, accurate access to this data?
  3. How does EIN Finder compile and update this data?
  4. Is every business in the U.S. listed in EIN Finder?
  5. Why is a given listing or address out-of-date?
  6. Can you search by “doing business as (DBA)” names?
  7. Is there a difference between an EIN and an FEIN?
  8. Is there a difference between an EIN and a TIN?
  9. What if I have a large number of records to match?
 
1.
What is EIN Finder?
EIN Finder is a searchable database of more than eight and a half million official employer identification numbers, also known as business tax identification numbers. These nine-digit numbers are assigned by the IRS to almost all businesses operating in the United States. EINs must be included on many filings required by the U.S. government and they also provide clear company identification in commercial transactions.
2.
Why do customers of EIN Finder need fast, accurate access to this data?
Employer identification numbers (EINs) are required to complete many types of forms, filings and transactions. Each business entity must have a unique EIN, just as each individual must have a unique social security number. EINs help to increase the security and integrity of business interactions while preventing identity theft or misrepresentation. (Note: Within large corporations, different business entities or divisions may be assigned different EINs.)
3.
How does EIN Finder compile and update this data?
EIN Finder compiles employer identification numbers from dozens of government sources and verifies their validity with the IRS.
4.
Is every business in the U.S. listed in EIN Finder?
We strive to include as many businesses as possible in EIN Finder. However, there is no single publicly available source from which to obtain every single employer identification number. That is why the EIN Finder team spends so many hours searching for new EINs from dozens of government sources to discover new additions and compile a robust database.

Additionally, there are several classes of businesses that are not required to obtain EINs. Sole proprietorships may use the owner’s social security number in lieu of an EIN, for example. Some trusts and estates are also not required to obtain EINs.
5.
Why is a given listing or address out-of-date?
We make every attempt to keep EIN Finder current. However, as is the case with many government document-based databases, there is often a lag between when the documents are submitted and when they are made available to the public and favored vendors. Additionally, certain common corporate events, such as bankruptcies, incorporations, mergers, purchases and sales, can require companies to obtain new EINs, but there is no central repository of this new information. Identifying the effected EINs and connecting old EINs with new EINs in EIN Finder requires additional research and discovery across many EIN sources, which can take time.

If you find a listing that you know to be out-of-date, please use our EIN Update feature to let us know, and we will correct it.
6.
Can you search by “doing business as (DBA)” names?
It is possible that the name provided by a company does not exactly match the name filed with the IRS on the EIN application, especially in the case of “doing business as (DBA)” names. For this reason, EIN Finder allows our customers to narrow the search by state and zip code. It is also for this reason that EIN Finder includes lists of alternate company names known to be associated with each EIN. In this way, EIN Finder can also help you find the legal name for companies that are operating under DBA names.
7.
Is there a difference between an EIN and an FEIN?
No. Some people refer to the EIN as an FEIN because it is issued by the federal government (Federal Employer Identification Number). The IRS now uses the term EIN exclusively.
8.
Is there a difference between an EIN and a TIN?
An EIN is one form of acceptable Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN). For individuals and sole proprietors only, a Social Security number also is an acceptable TIN. Most other types of business entities must obtain and use EINs.
9.
What if I have a large number of records to match?
The EIN Finder tool was designed to help users search for EINs one at a time. For those who need to find EINs for long lists of companies (or company names to match EINs), we offer our FASTmatch service. With FASTmatch, you can send your file to us and our team will append the missing EINs for you. FASTmatch is quick and easy. Click here to learn more.

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